Thursday, January 29, 2015

Hummis - a Yummy Must

How to Make Hummus Without a Recipe

Here at Food52, we love recipes — but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don’t always need a recipe, you’ll make your favorite dishes a lot more often.
Today: All you need to turn a can of chickpeas into the most versatile dip around is a food processor and a little creativity (and some good olive oil won’t hurt, either).
How to Make Hummus Without a Recipe
Oh, hummus. It should be the perfect food. It’s economical, it’s safe for even your crazy vegan friend with an endless list of food allergies, and it’s good for sharing. But it can go very, very wrong.  
Take a look at the hummus wall at most supermarkets and you’ll see that there are more varieties than there are gum flavors. But — just like that strawberry cheesecake gum — the crazy flavors of hummus often taste even worse than they sound. Pumpkin pie hummus? I know hummus and pumpkin pie filling have a similar consistency, but that doesn’t mean they should be mixed together. 
The real problem is that hummus has become the generic term for some sort of bean dip which, at its worst, is a vehicle for beans, oil, and stale spices. But use good beans, quality olive oil, and some fresh spices, and you can redeem hummus from its sad supermarket state. You can still have fun with flavors, adding in roasted carrots or smoked paprika, but the results will be much better. Since hummus is loaded with healthy beans and olive oil, you’ll still have room for that slice of pie afterwards — just don’t eat it on the same plate.  
Here’s how to make it:
1. Choose your flavor. I like to evaluate my fridge and pantry to see what needs to be used up. I might find a half-used jar of pesto or a spice blend and decide to mix it in. If you’re not a huge fan of chickpeas — or you’re tired of classic hummus — you can replace up to half the quantity with roasted vegetables. I’ve found that starchier veggies like sweet potatoes, beets, or carrots (pictured here), work best. Chop carrots or sweet potatoes, toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and roast in a hot oven, between 375° and 425° F, until soft and caramelized. For the beets, wrap them in aluminum foil and roast until tender, 35 to 50 minutes. Peel the beets once they’re cool, then give them a rough chop.

Hummis - a Yummy Must

How to Make Hummus Without a Recipe

Here at Food52, we love recipes — but do we always use them? Of course not. Because once you realize you don’t always need a recipe, you’ll make your favorite dishes a lot more often.
Today: All you need to turn a can of chickpeas into the most versatile dip around is a food processor and a little creativity (and some good olive oil won’t hurt, either).
How to Make Hummus Without a Recipe
Oh, hummus. It should be the perfect food. It’s economical, it’s safe for even your crazy vegan friend with an endless list of food allergies, and it’s good for sharing. But it can go very, very wrong.  
Take a look at the hummus wall at most supermarkets and you’ll see that there are more varieties than there are gum flavors. But — just like that strawberry cheesecake gum — the crazy flavors of hummus often taste even worse than they sound. Pumpkin pie hummus? I know hummus and pumpkin pie filling have a similar consistency, but that doesn’t mean they should be mixed together. 
The real problem is that hummus has become the generic term for some sort of bean dip which, at its worst, is a vehicle for beans, oil, and stale spices. But use good beans, quality olive oil, and some fresh spices, and you can redeem hummus from its sad supermarket state. You can still have fun with flavors, adding in roasted carrots or smoked paprika, but the results will be much better. Since hummus is loaded with healthy beans and olive oil, you’ll still have room for that slice of pie afterwards — just don’t eat it on the same plate.  
Here’s how to make it:
1. Choose your flavor. I like to evaluate my fridge and pantry to see what needs to be used up. I might find a half-used jar of pesto or a spice blend and decide to mix it in. If you’re not a huge fan of chickpeas — or you’re tired of classic hummus — you can replace up to half the quantity with roasted vegetables. I’ve found that starchier veggies like sweet potatoes, beets, or carrots (pictured here), work best. Chop carrots or sweet potatoes, toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and roast in a hot oven, between 375° and 425° F, until soft and caramelized. For the beets, wrap them in aluminum foil and roast until tender, 35 to 50 minutes. Peel the beets once they’re cool, then give them a rough chop.

Monday, January 26, 2015

Are You Ready For Some Football???

Great recipes all these week leading up to the  Super Bowl Who says you have to eat fried Buffalo Wings?

How about an alternative?
This may not be Raw, but it is Vegan!!!

Gluten Free Cauliflower Buffalo Wings with Homemade Vegan Ranch

 (serves 8-10 people or a few very hungry people)

  • 2 medium heads of cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1 cup white rice flour
  • 1 cup water
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic power
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika
  • 1 cup your favorite buffalo wing sauce (store bought or homemade. I used Frank’s Red Hot Buffalo Wing Sauce, which is vegan)Vegan Ranch Dipping Sauce.
  • 1 cup vegenaise
  • ½ cup vegan sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, minced fine
  • 1 tablespoon fine chopped dill
  • 1 tablespoon chives, chopped fine
  • ¼ cup Italian parsley, chopped fine
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon gluten free Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • **You can add a non dairy milk to thin out the sauce, but I left it as is to keep it nice and thick!**
  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  2. To make ranch sauce combine all ingredients, whisk until smooth and set aside.
  3. Combine rice flour, water, salt, garlic powder, paprika and whisk until combined.
  4. Dip cauliflower in batter and place on two baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Spray the tops with a bit of oil. Bake for 18-20 minutes or until the tops start to get color on them.
  5. Pull cauliflower out of the oven and lightly dip them into buffalo sauce to coat. Put them back into oven for another 5 minutes to crisp back up.
  6. Remove from oven and serve hot along side your homemade ranch dip.
This recipe tastefully prepared and created by:  AlexTCooks.com

Are You Ready For Some Football???

Great recipes all these week leading up to the  Super Bowl Who says you have to eat fried Buffalo Wings?

How about an alternative?
This may not be Raw, but it is Vegan!!!

Gluten Free Cauliflower Buffalo Wings with Homemade Vegan Ranch

 (serves 8-10 people or a few very hungry people)

  • 2 medium heads of cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1 cup white rice flour
  • 1 cup water
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic power
  • ¼ teaspoon paprika
  • 1 cup your favorite buffalo wing sauce (store bought or homemade. I used Frank’s Red Hot Buffalo Wing Sauce, which is vegan)Vegan Ranch Dipping Sauce.
  • 1 cup vegenaise
  • ½ cup vegan sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, minced fine
  • 1 tablespoon fine chopped dill
  • 1 tablespoon chives, chopped fine
  • ¼ cup Italian parsley, chopped fine
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon gluten free Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • **You can add a non dairy milk to thin out the sauce, but I left it as is to keep it nice and thick!**
  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  2. To make ranch sauce combine all ingredients, whisk until smooth and set aside.
  3. Combine rice flour, water, salt, garlic powder, paprika and whisk until combined.
  4. Dip cauliflower in batter and place on two baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Spray the tops with a bit of oil. Bake for 18-20 minutes or until the tops start to get color on them.
  5. Pull cauliflower out of the oven and lightly dip them into buffalo sauce to coat. Put them back into oven for another 5 minutes to crisp back up.
  6. Remove from oven and serve hot along side your homemade ranch dip.
This recipe tastefully prepared and created by:  AlexTCooks.com

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Oh no...my naturally blonde hair :-) needs help...too dry

So you know how beneficial olive oil is to your diet?  Research shows the following "Olive oil is high in antioxidants, substances that fight cancer. It also contains, oleic acid, a fatty acid that is believed to suppress a gene responsible for over 25% of breast cancers. Researchers believe that olive oil may be a contributing source to Mediterranean women's low rate of breast and ovarian cancer. However, it is important to remember that Mediterranean diets are also rich in fresh fruits, vegetables, and fish. These are all foods thought to reduce our risk of cancer" Health Benefits of Olive Oil

So now that we know that, let us deal with our hair.  I have tried olive oil in my hair before,and although I smelled like salad and had to grab some wine to go with my salad head. 
and we know this is good for us
But how do you choose the olive oil?  There are so many out there - Virgin, Extra Virgin, Light, and whatever the grocery has on sale...

Here you go....

INGREDIENTS 
 (enough for 1 or 2 treatments, depending on the length and thickness of your hair)
½ cup olive oil
5 drops frankincense essential oil (others may be substituted, if you wish)
1 plastic bag that can fit over your hair


1. Pour olive oil into a jar with a lid, then add essential oil. Put lid on jar and shake well to disperse the essential oil. Let sit for 24 hours in a cool, dark place. Shake again before use.

2. Rinse hair with warm water. Warm 1 tablespoon of oil treatment in the palms of your hands. Using your fingertips (not nails), gently massage the oil into the scalp in a circular motion. Repeat until the entire scalp has been massaged. Rub the ends of your hair with the remaining oil.

3. Place a plastic bag over your hair, secure by tying or with a hair clip or clothespin, and allow the oil to remain for at least a half-hour.

4. Rinse well, then shampoo as usual.
Find more olive oil beauty tips here. For other ways to repair dry hair, try coconut oil or this great avocado-based recipe.


Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/olive-oil-hair-repair.html#ixzz3PkNMrn2d

Oh no...my naturally blonde hair :-) needs help...too dry

So you know how beneficial olive oil is to your diet?  Research shows the following "Olive oil is high in antioxidants, substances that fight cancer. It also contains, oleic acid, a fatty acid that is believed to suppress a gene responsible for over 25% of breast cancers. Researchers believe that olive oil may be a contributing source to Mediterranean women's low rate of breast and ovarian cancer. However, it is important to remember that Mediterranean diets are also rich in fresh fruits, vegetables, and fish. These are all foods thought to reduce our risk of cancer" Health Benefits of Olive Oil

So now that we know that, let us deal with our hair.  I have tried olive oil in my hair before,and although I smelled like salad and had to grab some wine to go with my salad head. 
and we know this is good for us
But how do you choose the olive oil?  There are so many out there - Virgin, Extra Virgin, Light, and whatever the grocery has on sale...

Here you go....

INGREDIENTS 
 (enough for 1 or 2 treatments, depending on the length and thickness of your hair)
½ cup olive oil
5 drops frankincense essential oil (others may be substituted, if you wish)
1 plastic bag that can fit over your hair


1. Pour olive oil into a jar with a lid, then add essential oil. Put lid on jar and shake well to disperse the essential oil. Let sit for 24 hours in a cool, dark place. Shake again before use.

2. Rinse hair with warm water. Warm 1 tablespoon of oil treatment in the palms of your hands. Using your fingertips (not nails), gently massage the oil into the scalp in a circular motion. Repeat until the entire scalp has been massaged. Rub the ends of your hair with the remaining oil.

3. Place a plastic bag over your hair, secure by tying or with a hair clip or clothespin, and allow the oil to remain for at least a half-hour.

4. Rinse well, then shampoo as usual.
Find more olive oil beauty tips here. For other ways to repair dry hair, try coconut oil or this great avocado-based recipe.


Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/olive-oil-hair-repair.html#ixzz3PkNMrn2d

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Get ready for some football!!

Avocado Jalapeño Poppers [Vegan]

Ingredients

    ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
    16 won ton wrappers
    1 avocado
    2 Jalapeño peppers
    Sea salt

Preparation

    Cut an avocado in half and remove the pit.
    Slice each half of the avocado into 8 chunks by cutting once across the middle and making 4 slices lengthwise, repeat for the other half, yielding 16 avocado pieces altogether.
    Remove the seeds and membrane from the inside of the jalapenos. Slice each jalapeno into 8 thin strips, yielding a total of 16 strips.
    Make an assembly line of won ton wrappers for faster working.
    Heat extra virgin olive oil in a pan with deep sides over medium-high heat. When you insert the back of a wooden spoon into the oil and bubbles appear you will know the oil is hot enough. At this point turn the heat back down to medium.
    Place a slice of avocado on the bottom corner of each won ton wrapper. Sprinkle with a small pinch of sea salt, and place a strip of jalapeno on top of the avocado chunk.
    Fold the bottom corner of the won ton wrapper over the avocado. Roll halfway, and then fold the sides of the won ton wrapper towards the center.
    Using a pastry brush or your finger, moisten the remaining corner of the won ton wrapper with water. Roll up tightly.
    Repeat the process for all 16 avocado jalapeno poppers.
    Cook the avocado jalapeno poppers in oil, 4 or 5 at time being careful not to overcrowd the pot. Cook 30 ~ 60 seconds per side to achieve a nice golden brown color.
    Drain poppers on a paper towel.

Notes

For a less spicy version of the avocado poppers omit the jalapeno.

Get ready for some football!!

Avocado Jalapeño Poppers [Vegan]

Ingredients

    ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
    16 won ton wrappers
    1 avocado
    2 Jalapeño peppers
    Sea salt

Preparation

    Cut an avocado in half and remove the pit.
    Slice each half of the avocado into 8 chunks by cutting once across the middle and making 4 slices lengthwise, repeat for the other half, yielding 16 avocado pieces altogether.
    Remove the seeds and membrane from the inside of the jalapenos. Slice each jalapeno into 8 thin strips, yielding a total of 16 strips.
    Make an assembly line of won ton wrappers for faster working.
    Heat extra virgin olive oil in a pan with deep sides over medium-high heat. When you insert the back of a wooden spoon into the oil and bubbles appear you will know the oil is hot enough. At this point turn the heat back down to medium.
    Place a slice of avocado on the bottom corner of each won ton wrapper. Sprinkle with a small pinch of sea salt, and place a strip of jalapeno on top of the avocado chunk.
    Fold the bottom corner of the won ton wrapper over the avocado. Roll halfway, and then fold the sides of the won ton wrapper towards the center.
    Using a pastry brush or your finger, moisten the remaining corner of the won ton wrapper with water. Roll up tightly.
    Repeat the process for all 16 avocado jalapeno poppers.
    Cook the avocado jalapeno poppers in oil, 4 or 5 at time being careful not to overcrowd the pot. Cook 30 ~ 60 seconds per side to achieve a nice golden brown color.
    Drain poppers on a paper towel.

Notes

For a less spicy version of the avocado poppers omit the jalapeno.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Check out this wonderfully yummy nosh :-)

Vegan Brownies {and a Cookbook Giveaway!}


Makes 12 to 16 brownies
From: Fat Witch Bake Sale, by Patricia Helding with Lucy Baker
Ingredients

    1½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour
    1½ cups vegan cane sugar
    ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
    ½ teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¾ cup water
    ¾ cup canola oil
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    ½ cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Instructions

    Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 9" × 9" baking pan with canola oil or vegan cooking spray. Dust with flour and tap out the excess.
    Sift the flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder, and salt into a large bowl. Add the water and oil and stir to combine. Stir in the vanilla. Stir in the walnuts, if using.
    Spread the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean or with only moist crumbs, not batter, on it. Cool in the pan on a rack for 1 hour. Cut into shapes just before serving.

Notes
Storage: The brownies will keep longer uncut. Cover the pan with plastic wrap or foil and store at room temperature for 4 to 5 days or in the refrigerator for 6 to 8 days.

Tip: Brownies don't always have to be square! Use cookie cutters to make different shapes.
Recipe by Cookbooks365 at http://www.cookbooks365.com/vegan-brownies-cookbook-giveaway/

Check out this wonderfully yummy nosh :-)

Vegan Brownies {and a Cookbook Giveaway!}


Makes 12 to 16 brownies
From: Fat Witch Bake Sale, by Patricia Helding with Lucy Baker
Ingredients

    1½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour
    1½ cups vegan cane sugar
    ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
    ½ teaspoon baking powder
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¾ cup water
    ¾ cup canola oil
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    ½ cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Instructions

    Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a 9" × 9" baking pan with canola oil or vegan cooking spray. Dust with flour and tap out the excess.
    Sift the flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder, and salt into a large bowl. Add the water and oil and stir to combine. Stir in the vanilla. Stir in the walnuts, if using.
    Spread the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean or with only moist crumbs, not batter, on it. Cool in the pan on a rack for 1 hour. Cut into shapes just before serving.

Notes
Storage: The brownies will keep longer uncut. Cover the pan with plastic wrap or foil and store at room temperature for 4 to 5 days or in the refrigerator for 6 to 8 days.

Tip: Brownies don't always have to be square! Use cookie cutters to make different shapes.
Recipe by Cookbooks365 at http://www.cookbooks365.com/vegan-brownies-cookbook-giveaway/

Monday, January 19, 2015

Happy Monday

Good morning to all and Happy Monday :-)  Today I will be working on something other than recipes, but if I see a yummy one, I will add it.  You can never have too many yummy recipes.
More later.....

Happy Monday

Good morning to all and Happy Monday :-)  Today I will be working on something other than recipes, but if I see a yummy one, I will add it.  You can never have too many yummy recipes.
More later.....

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Vegan Japanese Food?


Vegan Japanese Food
Japanese food can be superb for vegans, but unless you're vigilant or make it yourself it's easy to consume traces of fish products. Here's what you need to know.
Vegan Japanese at Cha Ya
Japanese cuisine is traditionally based on fish, rice, vegetables and noodles with some poultry and eggs. It wasn’t until the 1860s that red meat and dairy products were introduced to the Japanese diet. Beef bowl travesties and Kobe beef notwithstanding, fish and poultry products remain the most common non-vegan foods in authentic modern-day Japanese cooking.

Given that most Japanese cooking is based on rice, seaweed, and vegetables, you might think that vegans would have an easy time at Japanese restaurants. Sadly, the opposite is true. Of all the world’s cuisines, Japanese food may well be the #1 frustration for vegans. In most cases it comes infuriatingly close to being entirely vegan while still missing the mark. The most difficult thing about navigating Japanese food is that dashi is used in nearly everything. Dashi can be vegan, but it is usually made from fish flakes. In addition to soups, Dashi often appears in sushi rice, dipping sauces, dressings, and many other savory dishes. Dashi provides the umami flavor that can’t easily be replicated with other common Japanese ingredients.

So, to summarize the situation: the problem with Japanese food is that you can order vegetable sushi, without egg, and it’ll probably be 99.8 percent vegan. But unless the restaurant doesn’t use dashi to make its sushi rice, there’s no easy and reliable way to eat a 100 percent vegan meal at a typical Japanese restaurant.

There is one notable exception to this rule involving shojin-ryori, the vegetarian dishes developed by Buddhist monks. But even these can occasionally contain non-vegan ingredients. So you’re best off eating at an all-vegan Japanese restaurant—if you can find one. They’re rare but they do exist: Kajitsu in New York City, Shojin in Los Angeles, Cha-Ya in San Francisco and Berkeley, and Zen Japan in Australia.

If you lack a vegan-friendly Japanese restaurant in your area, don’t despair because you can cook incredible vegan Japanese food at home. There are several Japanese vegan cookbooks.

 
Japanese desserts are easier to find, as dashi is never used in sweet dishes. One vegan dessert that can be found throughout Japan is mochi, which is a soft rice dough that is often colored pink or green and filled with a sweet bean paste.

Vegan Japanese Food?


Vegan Japanese Food
Japanese food can be superb for vegans, but unless you're vigilant or make it yourself it's easy to consume traces of fish products. Here's what you need to know.
Vegan Japanese at Cha Ya
Japanese cuisine is traditionally based on fish, rice, vegetables and noodles with some poultry and eggs. It wasn’t until the 1860s that red meat and dairy products were introduced to the Japanese diet. Beef bowl travesties and Kobe beef notwithstanding, fish and poultry products remain the most common non-vegan foods in authentic modern-day Japanese cooking.

Given that most Japanese cooking is based on rice, seaweed, and vegetables, you might think that vegans would have an easy time at Japanese restaurants. Sadly, the opposite is true. Of all the world’s cuisines, Japanese food may well be the #1 frustration for vegans. In most cases it comes infuriatingly close to being entirely vegan while still missing the mark. The most difficult thing about navigating Japanese food is that dashi is used in nearly everything. Dashi can be vegan, but it is usually made from fish flakes. In addition to soups, Dashi often appears in sushi rice, dipping sauces, dressings, and many other savory dishes. Dashi provides the umami flavor that can’t easily be replicated with other common Japanese ingredients.

So, to summarize the situation: the problem with Japanese food is that you can order vegetable sushi, without egg, and it’ll probably be 99.8 percent vegan. But unless the restaurant doesn’t use dashi to make its sushi rice, there’s no easy and reliable way to eat a 100 percent vegan meal at a typical Japanese restaurant.

There is one notable exception to this rule involving shojin-ryori, the vegetarian dishes developed by Buddhist monks. But even these can occasionally contain non-vegan ingredients. So you’re best off eating at an all-vegan Japanese restaurant—if you can find one. They’re rare but they do exist: Kajitsu in New York City, Shojin in Los Angeles, Cha-Ya in San Francisco and Berkeley, and Zen Japan in Australia.

If you lack a vegan-friendly Japanese restaurant in your area, don’t despair because you can cook incredible vegan Japanese food at home. There are several Japanese vegan cookbooks.

 
Japanese desserts are easier to find, as dashi is never used in sweet dishes. One vegan dessert that can be found throughout Japan is mochi, which is a soft rice dough that is often colored pink or green and filled with a sweet bean paste.

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

What's for Dinner? Beets.

Beetroot Cake That’s So Good, You Can Eat it for Dinner [Vegan, Raw, Gluten-Free]
Judy Moosmueller
January 12, 2015
If it's hard for you to go without meat once a week, try this vegan beetroot cake for dinner. It's rich and flavourful, packed with goodness and totally makes you forget that meat exists. It's a dessert, by the way, but sometimes dessert is a great main!
Beetroot Cake [Vegan, Raw, Gluten-Free]
This Recipe is :

Dairy FreePaleoRaw VeganSoy FreeVeganWheat Free
Ingredients

CRUST

    2 cups ground cashews
    ½ cup almonds blitzed into chunks
    1 tbsp raw cacao powder
    ¼ cup carob powder
    ½ cup soaked pitted dates
    (4-5 dates)

FILLING

    2 cups peeled and roughly chopped beetroot
    1 ½ cups ground cashews
    ¾ cup agave
    ¼ cup desiccated coconut
    ¼ cup cacao
    2 tbsp carob
    ¾ cocout oil, melted
    pinch Himalayan salt

CHOCOLATE TOPPING (OPTIONAL)

    ½ cup cacao
    ¼ cup carob
    ½  cup agave
    ½ cup coconut oil

Preparation

     Combine all crust ingredients in a blender until smooth. Sprinkle the carob/cacao powder in base of one large springform pan & press down crust mixture. Freeze.
     Blend agave and beetroot in blender until very smooth. Add cashew flour and blend again. Add remaining ingredients and process (do not overwork blender though). Pour mix over frozen base. Cover or seal cake on a flat surface for about 2 hours in the fridge or freezer until very firm.
     Process all topping ingredients until smooth. Pour over top of firm/frozen cake using a flat thick spatula to spread. Refreeze for 1-2 hours. It will be a thick topping! Let sit for 15 min before serving. I just refrigerate (rather than refreeze) the cake at this point and it should slice nicely even from fridge, but you can freeze and then let sit again before serving.
    Enjoy!

What's for Dinner? Beets.

Beetroot Cake That’s So Good, You Can Eat it for Dinner [Vegan, Raw, Gluten-Free]
Judy Moosmueller
January 12, 2015
If it's hard for you to go without meat once a week, try this vegan beetroot cake for dinner. It's rich and flavourful, packed with goodness and totally makes you forget that meat exists. It's a dessert, by the way, but sometimes dessert is a great main!
Beetroot Cake [Vegan, Raw, Gluten-Free]
This Recipe is :

Dairy FreePaleoRaw VeganSoy FreeVeganWheat Free
Ingredients

CRUST

    2 cups ground cashews
    ½ cup almonds blitzed into chunks
    1 tbsp raw cacao powder
    ¼ cup carob powder
    ½ cup soaked pitted dates
    (4-5 dates)

FILLING

    2 cups peeled and roughly chopped beetroot
    1 ½ cups ground cashews
    ¾ cup agave
    ¼ cup desiccated coconut
    ¼ cup cacao
    2 tbsp carob
    ¾ cocout oil, melted
    pinch Himalayan salt

CHOCOLATE TOPPING (OPTIONAL)

    ½ cup cacao
    ¼ cup carob
    ½  cup agave
    ½ cup coconut oil

Preparation

     Combine all crust ingredients in a blender until smooth. Sprinkle the carob/cacao powder in base of one large springform pan & press down crust mixture. Freeze.
     Blend agave and beetroot in blender until very smooth. Add cashew flour and blend again. Add remaining ingredients and process (do not overwork blender though). Pour mix over frozen base. Cover or seal cake on a flat surface for about 2 hours in the fridge or freezer until very firm.
     Process all topping ingredients until smooth. Pour over top of firm/frozen cake using a flat thick spatula to spread. Refreeze for 1-2 hours. It will be a thick topping! Let sit for 15 min before serving. I just refrigerate (rather than refreeze) the cake at this point and it should slice nicely even from fridge, but you can freeze and then let sit again before serving.
    Enjoy!

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Dairy Free Orange Creamsicle Smoothie

dairy free orange creamsicle smoothie
Sometimes I wish I was more of a cheerful morning person. A bit more pleasant, a smile on my face, ready to greet the day. For me, it takes some time. I'm the mom that needs a little extra grace when the sun comes up. I need my cup of coffee and a few quiet (non existing) minutes to wrap my brain around what needs to be done before we head out the door.
Other than coffee, fruit smoothies give me the boost I need in the morning. Especially when citrus is involved! There is something about fresh oranges in my smoothie that makes me smile. I love that oranges are in season right now and we always seem to have a bowl of mandarins on the kitchen counter. For this orange creamsicle smoothie, I used two mandarines, but you could also use one large orange. The touch of vanilla makes this morning drink taste like those popsicles we all know and love!
dairy free orange creamsicle smoothie
serves 2
    8 ice cubes
    1 frozen banana
    1 orange or 2 mandarines, peeled
    1/2 cup orange juice
    1/2 cup So Delicious unsweetened coconut milk or almond milk
    1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Add all ingredients to high-powered blender. Blend on high until smooth and blended well, 1-2 minutes. Pour into glasses and serve.
This yummy recipe was brought to you by

Dairy Free Orange Creamsicle Smoothie

dairy free orange creamsicle smoothie

Sometimes I wish I was more of a cheerful morning person. A bit more pleasant, a smile on my face, ready to greet the day. For me, it takes some time. I'm the mom that needs a little extra grace when the sun comes up. I need my cup of coffee and a few quiet (non existing) minutes to wrap my brain around what needs to be done before we head out the door.

Other than coffee, fruit smoothies give me the boost I need in the morning. Especially when citrus is involved! There is something about fresh oranges in my smoothie that makes me smile. I love that oranges are in season right now and we always seem to have a bowl of mandarins on the kitchen counter. For this orange creamsicle smoothie, I used two mandarines, but you could also use one large orange. The touch of vanilla makes this morning drink taste like those popsicles we all know and love!

dairy free orange creamsicle smoothie
serves 2

    8 ice cubes
    1 frozen banana
    1 orange or 2 mandarines, peeled
    1/2 cup orange juice
    1/2 cup So Delicious unsweetened coconut milk or almond milk
    1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Add all ingredients to high-powered blender. Blend on high until smooth and blended well, 1-2 minutes. Pour into glasses and serve.

This yummy recipe was brought to you by

Sunday, January 11, 2015

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Now for something fun to munch on,,,,

Sriracha & Maple Roasted Mixed Nuts


Recipe type: Snack, Gluten Free, Vegan
Ingredients
  • 3 cups roasted, unsalted mixed nuts, your favorite kinds
  • 1 tablespoon sriracha sauce*
  • 2½ tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 325 degrees F. Line a large sheet pan with parchment paper. Place nuts on top of the parchment paper and add sriracha, maple syrup, canola oil, and salt. Toss to coat with your fingers.
  2. Place the nuts into the oven and bake for about 20 minutes, tossing a few times with a spatula to make sure they don't all stick together.
  3. Once you have taken the nuts out of the oven, let them sit for about 20 minutes so they can harden up, but toss them around a few times while they cool or you may end up with one big mass of nuts.
Notes
*You can use more sriracha sauce depending on how spicy you want them to be.
This wonderful vegan recipe is brought you by:

Now for something fun to munch on,,,,

Sriracha & Maple Roasted Mixed Nuts


Recipe type: Snack, Gluten Free, Vegan
Ingredients
  • 3 cups roasted, unsalted mixed nuts, your favorite kinds
  • 1 tablespoon sriracha sauce*
  • 2½ tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 325 degrees F. Line a large sheet pan with parchment paper. Place nuts on top of the parchment paper and add sriracha, maple syrup, canola oil, and salt. Toss to coat with your fingers.
  2. Place the nuts into the oven and bake for about 20 minutes, tossing a few times with a spatula to make sure they don't all stick together.
  3. Once you have taken the nuts out of the oven, let them sit for about 20 minutes so they can harden up, but toss them around a few times while they cool or you may end up with one big mass of nuts.
Notes
*You can use more sriracha sauce depending on how spicy you want them to be.
This wonderful vegan recipe is brought you by:

Monday, January 5, 2015

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Clean eating seems pretty boring when you hear others talk about it, doesn’t it? What does clean eating even really mean? Sure, images of people washing their food may come to mind, but really, clean eating just boils down to how real your food is. We grew up thinking that fast food hamburgers and French fries were real food, along with boxes of cereal and oatmeal cream pies. But those are not real foods, far from it in fact. Anything with added ingredients that’s made in a lab or food plant is not real food, no matter how much it might appear to be. For example, cinnamon flavored oat cereal isn’t a form of clean eating like hot whole grain oatmeal cooked with real cinnamon is. The same goes for other foods we often write off as normal but are highly processed forms of whole foods.

Why does clean eating even matter?

A clean diet is like giving your body top notch fuel. Your body knows what to do with the information you’re putting in it and it can easily dictate how to use the nutrients in the foods you use for your benefit. When highly processed foods are eaten, it can often get confused or bogged down. Imagine pouring a gallon of grease down a sink. Sure, it will still go through the drain, but there’s going to be some back up and consequences down the line. (In other words, you better get out the plunger and some Drano!)
The same principle applies to clean eating and the human body. Whole foods with little ingredients or only one, is ultimately what our bodies appreciate best. But let’s face it, sometimes the processed stuff does look appealing and sometimes we’re either too hungry or tired (or bored) to make the best decisions. We all have to do what we can, but making clean food more appealing and doable will increase the chances you’ll eat clean foods more often.
Here are some tips to get you started:

1. Figure Out and Value the “Why”


Before you can decide that you’re going to eat clean, you need to have a clear goal in mind as to why you’re choosing to eat a clean diet. Maybe it’s to improve your energy, maybe it’s to improve your mood, or maybe it’s to lose weight or lower your risk for disease. Whatever the reason, figure out the why and have a clear goal in mind. This can make even the simplest of everyday foods seem more appealing.

2. Slow Shop


Clean Eating Tips
Jellaluna/Flickr
It’s hard to appreciate the joys of eating clean when you rush through the store after your work day in a tizzy and all upset. No apple or bunch of broccoli is going to look appealing then, especially next to the salty chips and bars of chocolate that you’re really in the mood for when you’re stressed. It’s much better to shop when you’re relaxed and have time to think about your meals and when you’re able to choose healthy, whole foods while also appreciating them. If you’d like to carry a list, great!  If not, just shop slow throughout the store and choose natural whole foods from fruits, vegetables, raw nuts and seeds, beans, legumes, whole grains, and minimal processed foods like unsweetened non-dairy milk, spices, whole grain flours or nut-based flours. Here’s a great shopping list for the Newbie Plant-Based Eater if you’d like some extra help.

3. Learn the Value of Nutrients


wholefoodsproduce
Erelster/Flickr
It’s hard to appreciate clean eating when you don’t really understand how nutrients work within your body. For instance, once you understand that the B vitamins and iron in leafy greens help fuel your energy and that their chlorophyll and fiber help keep your system clean and clear, it’s much easier to appreciate the crisp bite of a raw salad or the hearty fill of a cooked bowl of greens. An apple has never tasted so good once you understand their Vitamin C and phytonutrients have actually been proven to improve brain health. And then there’s the healthy fats in nuts and seeds that keep your heart healthy and free from cholesterol, and the fiber beta-glucan found in many whole grains that has been shown to clear the arteries and even reduce your waistline. Learning the value of foods will go a long way in helping you appreciate them more. See all of our health articles here on One Green Planet, read whole foods-based health websites and magazines, and learn from reputable plant-based nutrition websites to learn all about the nutrients from your food as much as you can. It’s pretty fascinating how fabulous food is, even when it comes to preventing disease.

4. Prepare Your Foods Simply, yet Creatively


No need to make things difficult in the kitchen if you don’t have to, but preparing your healthy foods creatively can also make things more fun and also inspire you to try them in non-conventional ways. For example, try creative ways to use plain raw leafy greens with these 10 Creative and Delicious Tips for Flavoring Raw Leafy Greens, find out Creative Ways to Use Kitchen Scraps to prepare a meal in minutes, and check out some creative add-ins for your oatmeal while you’re at it. Let’s also not forget the power of a smoothie in upping the creativity factor and beating the food boredom. Take your blender, throw in whatever fruits and veggies look good, some raw nuts and seeds, a little non-dairy milk , and some superfoods, raw oats or plant-based protein if you like. Add some ice, blend, and you’ve got a magical concoction that can be made so many different ways. And it’s all from clean food!




http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/make-clean-eating-more-doable-and-appealing-with-these-tips/

Share this....

Clean eating seems pretty boring when you hear others talk about it, doesn’t it? What does clean eating even really mean? Sure, images of people washing their food may come to mind, but really, clean eating just boils down to how real your food is. We grew up thinking that fast food hamburgers and French fries were real food, along with boxes of cereal and oatmeal cream pies. But those are not real foods, far from it in fact. Anything with added ingredients that’s made in a lab or food plant is not real food, no matter how much it might appear to be. For example, cinnamon flavored oat cereal isn’t a form of clean eating like hot whole grain oatmeal cooked with real cinnamon is. The same goes for other foods we often write off as normal but are highly processed forms of whole foods.

Why does clean eating even matter?

A clean diet is like giving your body top notch fuel. Your body knows what to do with the information you’re putting in it and it can easily dictate how to use the nutrients in the foods you use for your benefit. When highly processed foods are eaten, it can often get confused or bogged down. Imagine pouring a gallon of grease down a sink. Sure, it will still go through the drain, but there’s going to be some back up and consequences down the line. (In other words, you better get out the plunger and some Drano!)
The same principle applies to clean eating and the human body. Whole foods with little ingredients or only one, is ultimately what our bodies appreciate best. But let’s face it, sometimes the processed stuff does look appealing and sometimes we’re either too hungry or tired (or bored) to make the best decisions. We all have to do what we can, but making clean food more appealing and doable will increase the chances you’ll eat clean foods more often.
Here are some tips to get you started:

1. Figure Out and Value the “Why”


Before you can decide that you’re going to eat clean, you need to have a clear goal in mind as to why you’re choosing to eat a clean diet. Maybe it’s to improve your energy, maybe it’s to improve your mood, or maybe it’s to lose weight or lower your risk for disease. Whatever the reason, figure out the why and have a clear goal in mind. This can make even the simplest of everyday foods seem more appealing.

2. Slow Shop


Clean Eating Tips
Jellaluna/Flickr
It’s hard to appreciate the joys of eating clean when you rush through the store after your work day in a tizzy and all upset. No apple or bunch of broccoli is going to look appealing then, especially next to the salty chips and bars of chocolate that you’re really in the mood for when you’re stressed. It’s much better to shop when you’re relaxed and have time to think about your meals and when you’re able to choose healthy, whole foods while also appreciating them. If you’d like to carry a list, great!  If not, just shop slow throughout the store and choose natural whole foods from fruits, vegetables, raw nuts and seeds, beans, legumes, whole grains, and minimal processed foods like unsweetened non-dairy milk, spices, whole grain flours or nut-based flours. Here’s a great shopping list for the Newbie Plant-Based Eater if you’d like some extra help.

3. Learn the Value of Nutrients


wholefoodsproduce
Erelster/Flickr
It’s hard to appreciate clean eating when you don’t really understand how nutrients work within your body. For instance, once you understand that the B vitamins and iron in leafy greens help fuel your energy and that their chlorophyll and fiber help keep your system clean and clear, it’s much easier to appreciate the crisp bite of a raw salad or the hearty fill of a cooked bowl of greens. An apple has never tasted so good once you understand their Vitamin C and phytonutrients have actually been proven to improve brain health. And then there’s the healthy fats in nuts and seeds that keep your heart healthy and free from cholesterol, and the fiber beta-glucan found in many whole grains that has been shown to clear the arteries and even reduce your waistline. Learning the value of foods will go a long way in helping you appreciate them more. See all of our health articles here on One Green Planet, read whole foods-based health websites and magazines, and learn from reputable plant-based nutrition websites to learn all about the nutrients from your food as much as you can. It’s pretty fascinating how fabulous food is, even when it comes to preventing disease.

4. Prepare Your Foods Simply, yet Creatively


No need to make things difficult in the kitchen if you don’t have to, but preparing your healthy foods creatively can also make things more fun and also inspire you to try them in non-conventional ways. For example, try creative ways to use plain raw leafy greens with these 10 Creative and Delicious Tips for Flavoring Raw Leafy Greens, find out Creative Ways to Use Kitchen Scraps to prepare a meal in minutes, and check out some creative add-ins for your oatmeal while you’re at it. Let’s also not forget the power of a smoothie in upping the creativity factor and beating the food boredom. Take your blender, throw in whatever fruits and veggies look good, some raw nuts and seeds, a little non-dairy milk , and some superfoods, raw oats or plant-based protein if you like. Add some ice, blend, and you’ve got a magical concoction that can be made so many different ways. And it’s all from clean food!




http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/make-clean-eating-more-doable-and-appealing-with-these-tips/